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Ify's things


randomlovesawkward:

"Badass Versions of Beloved Characters"

by Sylvain Sarrailh: http://tohad.deviantart.com/


h3adphonez:

it makes me feel better knowing she’s an assassin


  • me rewatching season one of any show: I CAN'T DO THIS LOOK AT THEM THEY'RE JUST BABIES

epic-vines:

When Michael Jackson gets woke up for school
Vine by: The Black Simba


theatlantic:

The Quiet Radicalism of All That

The ’90s were golden years for Nickelodeon. The children’s cable television network was home to now cult-classic shows like Are You Afraid of the Dark? (1991-2000), Clarissa Explains It All (1991-’94), The Secret Life of Alex Mack (1994-’98), and Salute Your Shorts (1991-’92)—arguably heretofore unmatched in their clever, un-condescending approach to entertaining young people. Nick News with Linda Ellerbee launched in 1992, and remains to this day one of the only shows on-air devoted to frank, engaging discussions of teen issues and opinions.

But perhaps the program that best embodied the values of Nick in those years was All That, a sketch-comedy show that premiered 20 years ago today. Created by Brian Robbins and Mike Tollin, All That ran for an impressive 10 seasons before it was canceled in 2005. The prolific franchise spawned a number of spin-offs (Good Burger, Kenan & Kel, The Amanda Show) and launched the careers of several comedy mainstays: Kenan Thompson, Amanda Bynes, Nick Cannon, and Taran Killam.

Like Saturday Night Live (which would later hire Thompson and Killam), All That was a communal pop-cultural touchstone. The parents of ’90s kids had the Church Lady, “more cowbell,” and Roseanne Roseannadanna; the kids themselves, though, had Pierre Escargot, “Vital Information,” and Repairman Man Man Man, and we recited their catch-phrases to one another in the cafeteria and on the playground. Although All That was clearly designed as a SNL, Jr., of sorts, it wasn’t merely starter sketch comedy—it was an admittedly daring venture for a children’s network to embark on.

In its own right, All That was a weirdly subversive little show. It never explicitly crossed the line into “mature” territory, but it constantly flirted with the limits of FCC-approved family-friendliness. Take, for instance, the “Ask Ashley” sketch. A barely tween-aged Amanda Bynes (Seasons Three to Six), played an adorably wide-eyed video advice-columnist. Ashley (“That’s me!”) would read painfully dimwitted letters from fans with clearly solvable problems. (Example: “Dear Ashley, I live in a two-story house and my room is upstairs. Every morning, when it’s time to go to school, I jump out the window. So far I’ve broken my leg 17 times. Do you have any helpful suggestions for me?”) She would wait a beat, smile sweetly into the camera, then fly into a manic rage; emitting a stream of G-rated curses, always tantalizingly on the verge of spitting a true obscenity into the mix.

Read more. [Image: Nickelodeon]


myroyalobsession:

William looks like he’s thinking, “Geez, son, settle down!” in the first gif! Haha


bloodyarmin:

imaginarycomics:

I AM THE OVERTEEN

ALL BOW BEFORE THE OVERTEEN

you are the dancing queen
young and sweet
only over teen


stillpartwhole:

krudman:

the-average-gatsby:

thanks joffrey

What a great message. I wish all characters were this nice. Does anyone know what this is from?

Game of Thrones. A very happy series with a wide range of cast members and it’s just a positive series


thedailylovejournal:

It’s out there. Now everybody knows.. (x)


audio-awesome:

Shawty got a big ol’ BUtt



this is the most important gif on the INTERNET


kleine-asbar:

axeeeee:

OKAY THIS IS ONE OF THE CUTEST THINGS I HAVE EVER SEEN


"The problem is that white people see racism as conscious hate, when racism is bigger than that. Racism is a complex system of social and political levers and pulleys set up generations ago to continue working on the behalf of whites at other people’s expense, whether whites know/like it or not. Racism is an insidious cultural disease. It is so insidious that it doesn’t care if you are a white person who likes black people; it’s still going to find a way to infect how you deal with people who don’t look like you. Yes, racism looks like hate, but hate is just one manifestation. Privilege is another. Access is another. Ignorance is another. Apathy is another. And so on. So while I agree with people who say no one is born racist, it remains a powerful system that we’re immediately born into. It’s like being born into air: you take it in as soon as you breathe. It’s not a cold that you can get over. There is no anti-racist certification class. It’s a set of socioeconomic traps and cultural values that are fired up every time we interact with the world. It is a thing you have to keep scooping out of the boat of your life to keep from drowning in it. I know it’s hard work, but it’s the price you pay for owning everything."

Scott Wood (X)


zodiacsociety:


facina-oris:

KRIKOR JABOTIAN SS 2014



I dunno I'm just a ''whatever' blog. As in I reblog whatever catches my fancy :)





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